Browse Tag

Section 75 of the Credit Consumer Act 1974

Start the Week

It’s Monday and the start of another week, today we highlight some more new names that have been cropping up over the weekend, we start first with Davies and Howell Associates a new cold calling claims company.

The company was registered on 30 August 2017, with the company registration number 10939012, with the registered address  20-22 Wenlock Road, London, England, N1 7GU. Telephone: 0203 857 9497 and the email: [email protected]

The director is registered as David Alan Taylor, with the correspondence address as above, according to company records this is his first appointment. Chances are he is not the owner but just a front name.

They have a website http://www.daviesandhowell.co.uk/  which was registered on 22 October 2017, a relatively new website and company. So what are they offering?

According to their website they have a wealth of experience and knowledge spanning over 40 years in the holiday ownership and financial services markets. They claim they are able to extricate you from your timeshare contract and claim compensation. Reading between the lines with their mention of finance agreements and credit cards, this claim looks very much like a Section 75 of the Credit Consumer Act 1974.

As we have said before, if you have used your timeshare then a refund under Section 75 is unlikely, the timeshare company will rightly say that you have used it therefore you have received the goods or services paid for. If your timeshare company has gone into liquidation, then you may have a chance. Section 75 is unlikely to cover breaches of the Spanish Timeshare Laws, for this you would need to employ the services of a Spanish lawyer with extensive knowledge and experience of the timeshare laws in Spain. Also you must still be a member, once a contract has been cancelled you cannot take any case to court.

The website itself is very basic, having only one page and very little information, it looks like the classic information collection site. These are designed to collect as much information about you and your timeshare as possible, the chances are this is then used to pass on to other companies. So the moral of this story is beware.

We now move on to another new company that was found during our usual search on the internet, this company was highlighted by Mindtimeshare on 6 June. This is called Ashton Group, with the following address and telephone number:

H5 Hash Tree Court, Nottingham Business Park, NG86PY Nottingham, UK

Tel. 0044 203 519 23 38

At customer services is  Paul Menard

Email: [email protected]

So far we have not even found a website, even using the ashtonagency.co.uk from the email address draws a blank.

What actually caught our eye was the name of the legal representative, Sir Drummond McFadzean, so we began our search for this Knight of the Realm, well couldn’t find him. We did however find a Mr Drummond McFadzean, a director of  Ashton (Estate Agency) Ltd of Romford with an entry on Linkedin. Checking with Company House records we did find a company called Ashtons (Estate Agents) Ltd with a registered address in St Albans Herts. The director of this company since 1993 is MR KARL GEOFFREY JUDD, Drummond does not show on the directors list.

We did a search on the name of the company Ashton Group but found nothing relating to timeshare, there are however plenty of other companies with very similar names, including one in the USA which is a financial services company.

So there we have it what looks like another resale scam on the way, remember not all is as it seems, do your homework, check, check and check again, then double check. If you are unsure on any company that contacts you, or even  one that you have found while searching for a way out of your timeshare, then contact Inside Timeshare, we will point you in the right direction.

RSB Legal Update

Over the past few weeks Inside Timeshare has been receiving many enquiries about RSB Legal, all are of a very similar nature, money paid and now they are unable to contact them. Their phone lines are down and the website is no longer available. According to company house records there is an active proposal to strike them off.

From all the enquiries we have received all had been contacted by RSB Legal about making claim against their timeshare resort for mis-selling, this was to be on a no win no fee basis. A meeting was then arranged at RSB Legals Office in Redditch, once there all have said it turned out to be just like the presentation for their timeshares.

The “consultants” went on about how the timeshares had been mis-sold and that they had very good cases for a claim. But then came the crunch, in order to do the claim under no win no fee, the contract had to be cancelled first. For this a large amount of money needed to be paid first, so deposits were taken and a date for the balance to be paid arranged.

The client was also told not to pay any more maintenance fees, as the contract would be cancelled.

All those who have made enquiries have the same story, they have received demands for maintenance fees from their resorts, also being told that their contracts have not been cancelled by RSB Legal or by Taylor Marshall who took on many of the cancellations from RSB.

We do know many RSB clients have received an email or letter from Club La Costa, this states that they have not paid out compensation or cancelled any contracts for clients of RSB Legal or Taylor Marshall. They have repeatedly informed these companies that they will not deal with third party companies in respect of their members, they will only deal directly with the members concerned.

They have also pointed out that CLC will allow any members to surrender their membership free of charge, which RSB Legal and Taylor Marshall were fully aware of.

RSB Legal also told their clients that the claim would be going through the Spanish courts, no cases have ever been filed, clients were not informed of which lawyers had their cases, no translations of documents had been done and no power of attorney signed to allow the Spanish lawyer to act on the clients behalf.

It is also a point of fact, that once the contract is cancelled then no claim can ever be brought to a court, so this then leaves the question how the claim would be made?

Just from the number of enquiries Inside Timeshare has received recently with the average payment made to RSB Legal being around £8,000 mark, some have been considerably more, we are looking at over £100,000 which just these few have lost. Multiply that by the possibly hundreds more clients that have been taken in by RSB Legal and we must be looking at well over one million pounds swindled over the 2 years this company has been in operation. This is looking like a major fraud, it begs the question why have the authorities not done anything about them?

If you have paid RSB Legal and have paid any amount by credit card, then you may have a chance of getting your money back through Section 75 of the Credit Consumer Act 1974. Provided you have paid a minimum of £100 by your credit card then you can claim back the full amount upto £30,000.

As this company is appears to be no longer trading, plus the fact a proposal to strike off has been made, will make the claim through section 75 stronger as the company is no longer solvent therefore you will not receive the goods or services paid for, in other words they have breached their contract with you. See link below for full details on section 75.

https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/shopping/section75-protect-your-purchases

It would also be prudent to make an official report to the police and receive a crime number, this can be done very easily online through Action Fraud. The more that report this the more chance of an investigation. You can also make a complaint and report to Trading Standards. Details for both are at the links below.

https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

http://www.nationaltradingstandards.uk/contact/

If you have had any dealings with this company and have any questions or concerns then use our contact page, we will get back to you and answer your questions.

Have you been contacted by any company with a similar story and want to know if it is genuine, then contact Inside Timeshare, we’ll help you find out.

Remember doing your homework will save you in the end.

The Monday Briefing

Welcome to the start of another week, we begin with a quick look at a few companies that have been contacting timeshare owners with regards to claims.

The first is a company called Burgess Cooper International, according to information received they have an address in Dublin, Republic of Ireland:

Clifton House, Fitzwilliam Street Lower, Dublin, Ireland

This address is the Clifton House Business Center, which provides short and long term serviced office space. These types of offices are in regular use by many of the companies we highlight. There is also no record of any company registration either in Ireland or the UK Companies House.

Burgess Cooper also give the following telephone number: 03333 444 053

They also have a website

www.cooperburgessint.com

which was registered on 24 November 2017, the registration details are privacy protected, which means we are unable to find out who is behind this company. Their email address is linked to the website:

[email protected]

Now considering when this website was registered it does make their claims to clients on their success very dubious indeed, in fact they show two case studies on their website, although they do not give much in the way of detail.

It does look like the type of claim the will be filing for a client will be under Section 75 of the Credit Consumer Act 1974, this will be against the owners credit card company. One fact to remember here is most will have purchased over 6 years ago, will have used their timeshare and therefore will not have a valid claim against the credit card company. So do they also then make a charge for relinquishing the timeshare as the claim is on a “no win no fee” basis?

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The next is Centaurus Mediations, their website was registered on 2 November 2017 and once again is privacy protected:

http://centaurusmediations.com

[email protected]

The telephone number they provide is. 0034 922 927643

The address they give on the website is:

237/3 Royal Palm, Calle Santa Rosa 1 Los Christianos Arona

and they also show a map on their contact page. The strange thing is according to their About us page, “Centaurus Mediators has its headquarters in our luxury Tenerife offices”. Which also house their mediators, negotiators, claims assessors, human resources, accounts and company officers.

Yet this address if for the The Royal Palm Holiday Apartments, so looking at Google maps on satellite view, there appears to be no luxury offices on that street, could they just be using an apartment?

According to their website they have already had the following success:

  • 327 Mediations
  • 151 Relinquishments
  • 97 Successful Claims
  • 64 Agreed Terminations.

There is a company registration with the CIF Number of B76750868 according to the registration Centaurus Mediations SL was only registered on 31 October 2017 so considering this date the above statistics are very impressive. The Sole Administrator is one Caroline Hiberry, who is also listed as the sole administrator for the following companies:

Some of these are very familiar from the past.

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Another company that has surfaced is Britanica Consumer Consultancy, with the address:

130 Old Street, London. EC1V 9BD

Which again is a service address.

Telephone number: 0207 100 9649

There is no website and the email address is just one registered with outlook.com

[email protected]

No registration at company house can be found, so with the information above does make the company look very dubious indeed.

The modus operandi is very familiar, the owner is told that the court has awarded them a substantial amount, even though they didn’t even know they had a case or claim at court!

A slight difference to this operation is that it is not “tax” that needs to be paid to release the money, it is translation costs for all the paperwork. The cost for this is in the region of £2,000!

The strange thing is how did the court have the case before the paperwork had been translated into Spanish?

Again, unless you have employed the services of a lawyer, had translations done and had your case filed at court then you will not have a case or any money awarded to you. The courts do not award money in this way, they also do not employ the services of any company to trace clients.

Just these three companies we have highlighted goes to show how careful you must be, if you are contacted by any company offering anything similar to the above think and think again. Do not part with any money especially by bank transfer or any other means such as Western Union. It is also very important to remember any reputable company does not ask for payments to be made into the name of a private individual.

If you require any help in checking the validity of any company or the story they tell you, contact Inside Timeshare, we will point you in the right direction.

Remember doing your homework will save you a lot of money in the end.

homework1

Friday’s Letter from America

It’s that time of the week again, so welcome to this week’s Friday’s Letter from America, this week we publish Part II of Timeshare Debt and Hedge Funds. This article is from Justin Morgan and Michael Nuwer, with the introduction from our very own Irene Parker. But as usual a roundup from Europe.

It has been a very busy week in the courts again with many case being heard, with sentence still to be issued by the judge but there have been a few announced.

gavela

On Monday there were two announcements, the first was the judge of the Court of First Instance in Maspalomas found against Anfi, once again the contract was declared null and void, the client in this case will be returned over 12,000€ plus legal interest. The courts are certainly sticking to the letter of the law.

In the second case that was announced, the Court of First Instance in Tenerife found against Silverpoint (Resort Properties). In this case the judge found that the contract was in breach of the timeshare law 42/98 in that it exceeded the 50 years that is allowed, this should have also been explained to the customer before signing.

The judge declared the contract null and void, ordering Silverpoint to pay the client over £59,000 plus legal interest.

The following day, Tuesday, another sentence against Anfi was announced by the Judge of the Court of First Instance in Maspalomas. Another contract was declared null and void, with Anfi being ordered to return over 26,000€ plus legal interest.

Back in September Petchey Leisure (now MGM Muthu) was ordered to repay over 16,000€ and declared the contract null and void, by the High Court in Tenerife. The client in that case has now had the money transferred to their bank account.

On Thursday, there were three court sentences announced, Once again Anfi have been ordered to return over 20.000€ plus legal interest, this was by the Court of First Instance in Maspalomas. The judge also declared the contract null and void.

In Tenerife the Court of First Instance declared a Silverpoint contract null and void, ordering the return of over 30,000€ plus legal interest.

In the High Court in Tenerife, Regency Resorts was ordered to return £35,200 plus an extra £35,200 as double the deposit taken in the cooling off period, which is forbidden by law. This particular client will now be receiving £70,400 plus legal fees and legal interest. A nice Christmas present for this client!

Today as we this article was being prepared for publishing the following news was issued in a press release:

The Supreme Court in Madrid issued another damning sentence against Silverpoint, the Court ordered the return of the full purchase price plus double the deposit and all legal fees. The contract was also declared null and void. In this case the client will be receiving over £105,000.

All these cases have been brought on behalf of clients by the Arguineguin law firm Canarian Legal Alliance, who are certainly at the forefront in the field of timeshare law.

cla-brochure

Inside Timeshare is still receiving many enquiries regarding “claims” companies and “law firms” contacting owners with the promise that they have cases and can get their money back. Many of these readers don’t even own in Spain, or even upgraded in Spain since the law came into place in 1999, so how can these cases go to the Spanish Courts?

Some of these are also being told that they pay for a relinquishment, then the claim will be filed on a no win no fee basis. This can only mean one thing, an attempt to claim under Section 75 of the Credit Consumer Act 1974. Another aspect to this is the client will also be told at the meeting the only way they can do this is by purchasing another product! Sounds like the classic “bait and switch”!

There is also more news which at present we cannot publish as it has not been verified, so that is it from Europe, now on with our Letter from America.

Timeshare Debt and Hedge Funds – The Developer vs the Member

wall st

By Justin Morgan and Michael Nuwer

November 17, 2017

On Monday Inside Timeshare published an article comparing hedge fund involvement in Puerto Rico to hedge fund involvement in timeshare. Today we examine further how debt affects timeshare with help from Economics Professor Michael Nuwer and private equity investor Justin Morgan.

http://insidetimeshare.com/tuesday-slot-american-perspective-comparison/

Introduction by Irene Parker

As a Diamond Resorts member, I have access to information I would not have about other timeshare companies, so once again Diamond is used as an example with help from Michael Nuwer, also a DRI member, and Justin Morgan, a former DRI member, to explain the mechanics of timeshare inventory valuation and timeshare debt.

I asked Inside Timeshare Australian Contributor Justin Morgan how a company like Diamond can have a $2.2 billion dollar valuation when the entire inventory of points is worthless to the members, given so many complaints about the lack of a secondary market. Of course, there is value to staying at a property, but for discussion purposes, timeshares are a liability on an individual member’s net worth statement. Inside Timeshare has received 196 timeshare complaints from our readers against four major developers. The majority allege they were sold or upsold by deceit and bait and switch. I have interviewed many families devastated, sometimes just weeks after purchase.

In an article I wrote for TheStreet, I expressed concern over inventory valuation irregularities that delayed DRI’s second quarter 2016 earnings report, the last public report before being taken private. Diamond previously reported 11 quarters of consecutive robust earnings growth. After announcing the delay, just after the Apollo acquisition announcement, earnings had to be restated from 2014 going forward.

“After the correction, the change resulted in a decrease in net income of $5.6 million for 2015 and a $1.3 million decrease for the first quarter, in each case from amounts originally reported, according to the second-quarter release. Significantly, second-quarter net income decreased $10.1 million or 28.5% to $25.5 million year over year, compared with a first quarter increase of $8.4% or 32.6% to $34.4 million, prior to the restatement.”

https://www.thestreet.com/story/13702895/1/diamond-resorts-international-s-second-quarter-earnings-reversal-is-worrisome.html

Justin Morgan’s analysis

The whole industry itself uses some quite questionable inventory valuation methods that may be designed, according to some, to target more the financing arrangements that were the traditional model in the industry when GMAC and others were underwriting timeshare sales departments. This is why private hedge fund equity in the industry has somewhat caused a shift in thinking. If private equity is funding the model based upon equity vs loan models, the capital structures underneath begin to change. The same accounting reports will still be drawn upon to make sense of the numbers, but let’s not forget that inventory valuations do have a bit of leeway to move. Even financial reporting itself can diverge from standard reporting models, but it usually is flagged as a change in accounting methodology that would have otherwise tipped off Apollo.

Like Enron, it depends upon who’s looking, and who might be wanting to look away to get a deal done. Even if Apollo did know, it doesn’t mean they’d fess to the knowledge of spotting an irregularity if they believed they were able to profit in the end, and I believe that Michael Nuwer showed the sort of cap structure that Apollo introduced. It largely turned the debt into the membership, so whilst Apollo may have even noticed non-standard valuations, it might have only forced a better price to come from Diamond vs flagging the issue or walking away from the overall deal. Clearly, Apollo are their own beast in these type of private equity deals which reap profits and shift debt restructuring unwittingly into club members. This is a bigger issue. It’s like taking a loan out in someone else’s name and handing them the bill after you’ve taken what you want for the deal. Club members were only ever at Apollo-DRI’s mercy after this.

There are definitely some important and significant value-implied shifts from these numbers since the street uses earnings to make their valuations, but the valuation of inventory is an area that is somewhat suitable itself. The industry bodies know how to make it work and actually fought to use non-standard inventory models. But I’ve not gauged for differences between the pre-order hedge fund industry and the one we’re seeing rise out of the seas today.

I have looked with horror upon the entry of these private hedge funds because I know that they have little interest in the product itself. They are only in it to devour the membership of as much as they can get, and given the legal models, that could be the scariest evolution to date. At least cryptocurrencies attempt to establish some monetary supply rules, but timeshare clubs know that they can just keep raising budgets legally to cover their required rates of returns.

In an industry that generally looks for 30% per annum returns as a rule of thumb, that’s going to cause some high maintenance fee jokes in the future. But I remember the old DRI hiking maintenance close to 25% circa 2007 and then again in 2009. They first blamed a strong economy, whilst the second blamed the weak economy. More like a satyr blowing hot and cold in the one breath! But the disturbing thing to me is how Apollo financed this whole arrangement. They shifted the debt onto the members. They made their money from the start…The rest is just cream…The debt which now pays the Apollonian entities is the debt Apollo created and lumped into the membership at the financing stage.

We must be clear. They created the debt specifically to land it on membership; so really, it is as if the DRI members paid a good chunk of the deal. If the Attorneys General don’t see this, then they’ll miss what chicanery has been done here.

Michael Nuwer

Diamond reports show increasing levels of bad debt accompanied by decreasing membership since the peak in 2013.

chart1

Membership is down 9% since 2013

chart2

One thing that is not clear to me is the economic value of points. It often appears that a developer sells the points (say 10,000 points) for, say, $20,000. But, the next day, if I (the owner) try to sell those points in the secondary market, they are worth, maybe, $1,000. (If Bluegreen points; DRI points are worth $0.) The economist in me thinks the developer originally sold me points for $1,000 plus a club membership for the remaining $19,000. Thus, if my points are foreclosed and resold for the full $20,000, only $1,000 is the value of the points.

So, the question here is: what is the developer selling. Is the sale just vacation points or is the sale a bundle that includes points plus other stuff? I’ve read my DRI contract many times and still can’t tell what it specifically covers.

So what happens when someone buys timeshare points?

Let’s look at this example:

Say Diamond makes a sale for $30,000. The buyer might make a down payment of 20% or $6,000. The remaining $24,000 is a loan. Diamond now has a short term financing problem. They have $6,000 in cash and $24,000 in a non-liquid asset. But Diamond has immediate operating costs. A bit more than $15,000 from the sale is needed for advertising, marketing, and commission expenses. The carrying cost of the inventory must also be paid. Additionally, Diamond faces G&A costs (general and administrative) which need to be paid. All of these are current expenses, but Diamond only has the cash down-payments to cover them.

To pay current expenses, Diamond borrows money from a bank (the jargon is a “warehouse facility”). This facility is a credit line agreement, and, just like my credit card, Diamond’s credit line has a limit. Before Apollo, Diamond’s credit line was $100 million with Capital One.

In short: Diamond must borrow money from a bank to cover the current year’s expenses while it waits 7-10 years to get re-paid on the outstanding loans made to members.

Securitization of the outstanding loans is a way to oil, and thereby speed-up, the lending machine. Once Diamond reaches its $100 million credit limit, it will not be able to offer more loans for the purchase of points. Thus, to overcome this limit, the company bundles outstanding loans into a trust fund and sells shares in that fund as an Asset-Backed Security. The proceeds from selling these shares are used to pay down the credit line and Diamond’s perpetual loan machine continues.

Irene asked how Apollo Global Management will fare in their purchase of DRI. Will the restatement of inventory valuation have an impact?

DRI EBITDA in 2015 was $385 million and thus the valuation multiple ($2200/385) is a mere 5.7. Apollo got the company for a steal. If they can spruce it up and get 10x, the valuation will be $3.8 billion. There’s Apollo’s 30% profit.

trust earned

Thank you to Michael Nuwer and Justin Morgan for their analysis. I have nothing against private equity, but extraordinary investment returns at the expense of timeshare members or Puerto Ricans is not acceptable if so many complaint allegations are true. In addition to 192 Inside Timeshare readers who are timeshare members, I have interviewed ten current and former timeshare sales agents that all confirm predatory sales practices are widespread in this industry. There have been several recent investigations and settlements by Attorneys General including New York, Wisconsin, Missouri, Arizona, Tennessee and Colorado as well as lawsuits too numerous to mention. It is our hope developers will confront the problem and work with member complaints to improve the quality of timeshare sales today rather than continue to deny such practices exists. Contact Inside Timeshare or an Advocacy Facebook if you have timeshare concerns.   

Timeshare self-help Facebook groups

https://www.facebook.com/timeshareadvocategroup/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/DiamondResortsOwnersAdvocacy/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/180578055325962/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/465692163568779/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1639958046252175/

Thank you to Justin and Michael, also to Irene for her introduction. This week Irene has been very busy dealing with the many enquiries we have received from US owners / members. Within an hour of publishing Tuesdays article, we received 3 pleas of help, these are sent to Irene who then makes contact with the relevant advice and which of our advocacy team can help. Keep up the great work US Team.

If you need any information or help with any timeshare matter and don’t know where to turn, Inside Timeshare is here to help.

Also remember to do your homework before engaging with any company that either contacts you or you find in an advert. This last one rings very true for one UK reader, She found an advert in the Royal British Legion Magazine for a company that said it could help with a claim. Being in the British legion magazine she believed it would be genuine, well we all would! Unfortunately, adverts are not checked for authenticity, they are sold by a marketing company to pay the cost of publication, the same is also true for any newspaper or magazine. So the it proves that you need to do your homework!

On that note, Friday is here, the weekend is once again upon us, so have a great weekend and we will be back on Monday.

friday dog

 

Friday’s Letter from America

Welcome to this week’s Friday’s Letter from America, it is not the article we originally planned as other events have taken over.

Firstly since Irene sent this article we have received some very sad news, Irene’s brother has sadly passed away. Inside Timeshare, along with all our readers and contributors, the staff at Canarian Legal Alliance send our deepest sympathies and condolences to Irene and all her family. Our thoughts are with you.

condolences

As we said last month, the time has come when all the new companies and some of the older ones will start to contact timeshare owners. This is usually the time it starts as the annual maintenance bills are starting to come through the post.

Inside Timeshare has been receiving many requests for information on these, most are for so called claims. It is surprising how many owners are being told that they have a claim for miss-selling, even though they purchased in places like Mexico.

Appointments at various offices around the UK are being arranged, but beware, these “claims” will result in either the purchase of another product, the offer of relinquishment and then a claim on a no win no fee basis. This will cost thousands of pounds, the claim will more than likely be under Section 75 of the Credit Consumer Act 1974. If the purchase was more than 6 years ago you cannot claim. If you have used your timeshare there is no claim, even if you have never used it you will not have a claim as it was available.

Section 75 only cover the following:

  1. You have not received the goods or services paid for
  2. The company goes into liquidation
  3. The goods are faulty
  4. The company turns out to be fraudulent

section 75At present the only successful claims have been through the Spanish Courts, where the timeshare laws are very strong. So unless you purchased in Spain since 1999, you will not have any basis for a claim and this will have to go through court.

So beware of these companies that say you have a valid claim, check and double check the facts.

On the subject of court cases, the following were announced during the course of this week.

The Court of First Instance Number 4 in Tenerife has found against EZE Group, at present we do not know what the infractions were, no doubt those will be released soon. But the court has declared the client’s contract null and void with the return of over £52,000 plus legal interest.

In another case on Gran Canaria, the High Court has found against Puerto Calma Marketing SL and Vista Amadores SL, which are all part of Holiday Club. In this case the Norwegian clients will receive over 57,000€ plus legal interest, they also have had their contract declared null and void. (The full sentences can be read in the attached PDF)

HC N2 PUERTO CALMA, sentence

These two case were brought on behalf of the clients by non other than the lawyers of Canarian Legal Alliance.

So now on with our shorter article from Irene.

Rather than rush through an article for our regular Friday Letter from America, I would like to reach out to all Inside Timeshare readers who have reached out to us burdened with timeshare loans, credit cards and maintenance fees as a result of medical and financial hardship.

Charles Thomas was not able to complete his trip to Orlando due to problems with Spain’s electronic VISA service. Little did I think the room we had booked for Charles at Diamond Resort’s Mystic Dunes would become part of a Hospice end of life plan for an immediate family member.

Life tends to throw us a few curve balls. My brother entered Hospice near his 86th birthday this month near Orlando. We were able to provide my other brother and his wife Charles’ room as my brother and I kept nightshift watch over our older brother at Good Shepherd Hospice.

The experience led me to think about all the timeshare members who have contacted me under similar circumstances burdened by cancer, a diagnosis of dementia, Bell’s palsy, concussion, loss of a spouse or loss of job or divorce leading to financial hardship. I thought about how much more difficult this family crisis would be if I had a timeshare debt collector calling on top of all this. The majority of readers allege they were deceived into buying points or more points told this would alleviate timeshare expense because of maintenance fee relief programs or selling points programs that do not exist. It is my deepest desire timeshare companies will look upon the financial devastation the lack of a secondary market and the actions of unscrupulous sales agents can cause.

The industry reaction is often to behead the messengers. All of our readers who have followed us and submitted articles as a Contributor are messengers. There has been a glimmer of regulatory action and Social Media no longer keeps victims isolated and silenced. In an earlier article, I reviewed Jay Baer’s book Hug Your Haters describing how Social Media is changing the face of Customer Service. Mr. Baer is scheduled to be keynote speaker at the upcoming Interval International Shared Ownership Conference attended by developers and private equity firms. It’s not your grandma’s timeshare anymore. Timeshare is big business and, in my opinion, for some companies it is motivated by greed. Deceit is also so ingrained it is accepted and encouraged top down. No one disputes there are honest sales agents who sell the product without misrepresentations, but with rising default rates, there is another reason for developers to listen to Mr. Baer because as he warns, “Haters are not your problem….Ignoring them is.”

jay baer
Jay Baer

As always, thank you Charles Thomas for being our voice for members who have been voiceless for too long.

http://insidetimeshare.com/hug-haters-part-ii-customer-service-message/

Thank you Irene, our appreciation for sending this article through under the circumstances, we all wish you and your family well.

Now to end this week, remember to check any company that you are dealing with, if you are not sure how to do this contact Inside Timeshare and we will point you in the right direction.

Have a good weekend.

weekend cat

Claiming Money Back From Your Credit Card.

There is a little tool that many people can use to get money back from companies they have paid, then never received the goods or services paid for. It is called Section 75 of The Credit Consumer Act 1974.

 

The law was put into place as protection for the consumer, it is not a case that your credit provider is doing you a favour, they are equally liable for the money if anything goes wrong. There are certain rules that govern this, provided you have paid using your credit card any sum over £100 you are covered for the full amount up to £30,000, even if you paid the balance by cheque or transfer.

 

Where I have seen this has been mainly in the holiday ownership area, mostly with resale companies. How many of you have paid a company to sell your timeshare only to find that in a year’s time they have disappeared?

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If this is the case you can claim this back from your credit card company, as they are  “jointly and severally liable”. The criteria for this claim is you have never received the goods or services promised, i.e. the sale of your timeshare. The company is no longer around or has gone into liquidation and or it was a fraudulent transaction under timeshare directives. This last point is using the EU Timeshare Directives about resale companies taking upfront fees, this is not allowed, the same as taking deposits within the cooling off period.

 

Many companies get around this by saying it is a marketing fee, in order to put your timeshare on a higher profile. Even RDO & TATOC members use this. To me it is still taking upfront fees to sell your timeshare. But this is obviously a point for those with legal brains to argue. At the end of the day there is no resale market, just look on ebay, people cannot even give them away.

 

Another area that section 75 has been successful, is with the various holiday clubs that have been around. Several years ago Incentive leisure Group / DWVC and Club Class were taken out of business by the authorities in the UK. Many people had paid thousands to join these so called clubs with the view of being free from their timeshare and maintenance.

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