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RSB Legal


The Tuesday Slot with Irene

This week’s Tuesday Slot with Irene has been submitted by Angela Simmons Sandstede, as you will see the story of what her parents have been through is not a happy one, it is another “Nightmare on Timeshare Street”.

First some European timeshare news.

Yesterday, the Court of First Instance Number 3 in Maspalomas announced yet another Anfi Contract null and void, the judge sitting on the trial was new and this was his first ever timeshare case. He awarded the UK clients £11,923 for the purchase price along with £13,248 for double the deposit paid within the cooling off period. The clients have also been awarded their legal fees and legal interest. Again this judge was following the rulings by the Supreme Court.

The case was brought on behalf of these clients by Canarian Legal Alliance, the lawyer representing them is one of their newest and youngest lawyers Eduardo Álamo, who only obtained his law degree in 2014, he then went on to study extra courses in 2015 and became a member of the Las Palmas Bar Association in 2016. Definitely a lawyer to keep an eye on.


Over the past few weeks Inside Timeshare has been receiving enquiries about a company called RSB Legal, these readers have paid this company for relinquishment and to lodge a claim on a no win no fee basis. Unfortunately they are are unable to contact them.

In another twist it has just come to light that another company Stanton Mortimer which we believe are linked to RSB run by Ricky Walker, Kevin Walker, Kevin O’Connor and Matt Lowe have now shut down and seem to have disappeared with many clients making criminal complaints.

RSB have also been the subject of many discussion forums, the one below goes back to late 2016.

If you have dealt with either of these companies contact Inside Timeshare and we will give you information on what you can do.

Now for this weeks article.

March 4 – 10 is NOT Consumer Protection Week for Timeshare Members – Part I

An Extraordinary Diamond Investment Opportunity that Wasn’t

Part II – Friday “Earth to ARDA” by Eron Grant


By Angela Simmons Sandstede on behalf of my parents

Please help my Mom and Dad Diamond Resorts, AARP, ARDA, Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson, and Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin

March 6, 2018

I am writing this article because my mom and dad had to sign a non-disclosure agreement. When my mom, who is diabetic, started slipping into a diabetic sugar shock during a sales presentation, the Diamond “Hospitality” representative at Mystic Dunes, Randy Siegel, told my parents to sign papers to lock in a price per point. What they really signed October 2017 was a purchase agreement to buy a Sampler (trial) package for $3,995. They already owned 78000 points. Why would they need a trial program? Diamond refunded all but the down payment. For this they had to sign an NDA? But guess what – this was nothing compared to what happened next. If you do the math, there is no alleged about what happened.  

Roy and Lillian Simmons, ages 69 and 70, Minnesota residents

My dad is a Navy Veteran

Our YouTube: You have to listen to the YouTube for this to make sense

My parents, Roy and Lillian Simmons, had been loyal and happy Diamond Platinum members for almost 20 years. By 2014 they had purchased three or four US Collection Diamond vacation point packages ending up with 27000 US Collection points. In 2014 they bought 25000 Hawaii points transferring their US Collection points to the Hawaii Collection now owning 52000 Hawaii points. Everything was fine up to this point.  

The horror began in 2015 when they were told they needed to transfer from the Hawaii Collection to the US Collection, buying 25000 more points for $151,192.  Now they owned 77000 US Collection points. Why back to the US Collection?

In Orlando Florida Diamond sales agent Rafael Cabrera told my parents they should not have bought Hawaii points. They were transferred from the Hawaii Collection back to the US Collection. The reasons:

  • Maintenance fees will go up because Hawaii is so expensive
  • They have hurricanes in Hawaii so they can have special assessments

March 31, 2016 they went to Diamond’s Ka’anapali Beach Resort in Hawaii. There they met with DRI sales agent John Jessup. Mr. Jessup told my parents they should transfer the US Collection points back to the Hawaii Collection to take advantage of a remarkable investment opportunity my dad described on our YouTube. It was remarkable, but it didn’t exist.

Transferring 77000 US Collection points back to the Hawaii Collection involved a weird 1000 Hawaii point purchase and transfer fee costing $32,840 or over $32 per point. You have to buy some points to transfer from one side of the ocean to the other. In other words, they were charged $32,433 for the non-existent investment opportunity. Diamond points, according to member reports, sell for $3 to $4 per point. Sales agents are quick to point out the list price is $9 going up to $11.     

According to my dad, he was told:

“Hawaii real estate is so valuable! Diamond can’t buy any more property. The “shares” are going to split! You can double your profits! You can get $3000 or $4000 a week for renting out your points!” said Mr. Jessup. “Being able to pay for maintenance fees and rent points is what sold us,” explained Mr. Simmons.

“I don’t know anything about Hawaii special assessments?” Mr. Jessup added.


My parents are about to lose their house over this! Their monthly Diamond loan payment is $2,750 per month.  

My mom and dad live mostly on my dad’s pension from the US Post office plus Social Security. My mom teaches piano part time. My dad works part time as a substitute in a school kitchen. They were able to manage 52000 points before the last fraudulent up-sell but can in no way afford 78000 DRI points.

Three Barclay cards were opened – two in my mom’s name and one in my dad’s name to charge the down payment. The interest rate jumped to 13.9% for the Hawaii points, but was 9% or 10% previously. When filling out the Barclaycard application, the sales agent crossed off with a black marker all their credit card/Diamond loan expense information, I assume so they would qualify. “We don’t need that information. We just need your home mortgage and car,” he said. I just found this out as well. Mr. Jessup also suggested my dad pay off the Diamond loan by taking the money out of his retirement plan. “I worked as a Financial Advisor. This would only be an 8 to 9% penalty,” Mr. Jessup advised. When my dad spoke to a real Financial Advisor, he was told taking money out of his government retirement plan would have cost over 40% in taxes and penalty.  

My mom is so stressed over this pathetic attempt to make them STAY VACATIONED she is losing her health and so upset she could not participate in our You Tube. Her sugar levels are worse, affected by stress.

Through Social Media I have learned this “ping pong” upsell is a common and deceptive false claim – sales agents working for the same company telling members you should not have bought this or that collection, depending on what side of the Pacific Ocean you are on. You don’t have to be a senior citizen to get confused about the back and forth transfer up-sells.

hands in hand

Diamond at first acted like they cared. I reached out to Diamond Resorts Consumer Advocacy January 8, 2018. They asked for income verification because of the up-sell dispute. My dad sent income verification three times, but they couldn’t find it even though it was faxed. Each time Diamond’s hospitality agent would say they didn’t receive it, but then would say they did. Then they told my parents they were making over $100,000 a year. My parents did not even make that much money when my dad worked for the US Post Office.

A Better Business Bureau report was filed the end of February. A few days after filing, the Better Business Bureau closed out the complaint because Diamond responded, “They signed a contract.”

The FBI advised a recent Diamond member, those who feel they have been a victim of deceit and bait and switch to file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission in addition to filing at and orally through the FBI’s public access line calling your local FBI field office (#4 then prompt #3 white-collar crimes). Contact Inside Timeshare if you have questions.

With all the complaints Inside Timeshare is receiving and passing over to the US team, this is only the tip of the iceberg. Irene and her other volunteers are inundated with formulating complaints ready for filing with the FBI, as we get results we will be informing you on these pages.

Remember, if you don’t know what to do whether it is similar to the above story, or you have been contacted by any company or just found a company on the internet and want to know if they are genuine, then contact Inside Timeshare for the best advice available. It will also help if you let us know if you are US or European based, this way we can point you to right team.


who are they

FHA Marketing: Who are They?

Inside Timeshare was today asked to check out another company calling about timeshare claims, FHA Marketing.

Their website:

There is no address given on the website only a phone number 0121 667 9401 which is Birmingham.

Shows no company information, no Company House registration number, then when searching Company House we find no record of any company with this name. The website itself was only registered on 15 March 2017, so is a very new company. The registrant is hidden by a privacy service, so there is no way to find out who is behind it.


Inside Timeshares contact called the company as they had been informed of the call by one of their own clients, when they asked about company details and registration numbers they were told “sorry I wouldn’t know anything about that I only manage the call center”. Well, surely if you are working for a company you would have all those details to hand.

They say in their email that they are working with a number of legal teams across the UK, running compensation claims against timeshare companies. They also go into some detail about the “groundbreaking” court rulings which are making this possible.

Their “legal actions” are processed by “claims assessors” who collate information for a claim on a no win no fee basis. These assessors offices are in Redditch with a satellite office in Manchester, the only company found in Redditch with an office in Manchester is RSB Legal. (So are they working with them?).

If the claim is successful it will be split 70/30 with 70% going to the client, this is the same figure for RSB Legal. Now the other factor to bare in mind is, even if the claim is successful you will still own your timeshare and be able to use it. If you want to be rid of it the assessor will give “free, independent and valuable advice on this”. (I will also wager that it will be a very hefty cost).

So it looks like they are going down the section 75 credit consumer act route.

There is only one problem with this, Inside Timeshare has not come across any case where a section 75 claim has paid out for any timeshare. After all you will have owned it for many years and been using it, so the credit card company quite rightly will claim that there is no claim as you have received the goods and services you paid for. Just because the law now says that any timeshare purchased in Spain which breaches their timeshare laws makes the contract illegal is not a basis for a claim.

The only way to claim for a mis-sold timeshare under the Spanish law is through legal action in court (which will aslo make the contract null & void) using a bona fide law firm with experience in this field. These are actually very few and far between as most law firms would not touch this area before the law was clarified by the Supreme Court. Which also brings up the point of the comment at the end of their email:

“Latest ruling from European Supreme Court in relation to perpetuity  –

EU LAW states that ‘’timeshares can only be sold for a period of between 3 and 50 years’’.


This ruling was not from the “European Supreme Court” which does not exist, it is known as the European Court of Justice.

This ruling was made by the Spanish Supreme Court in Madrid, with the first and subsequent 50 rulings being secured by only one law firm, which we have mentioned here in the past, Canarian Legal Alliance. These rulings also only apply to timeshares purchased in Spain since January 1999 when the law 42/98 was enacted.

CLA Logo

The EU Timeshare Directive is not law, they are just that, “directives”, which member states should enact into their own domestic laws. Spain included the maximum term for contracts no longer than 50 years as they believe it is wrong to enter into a contract with your children inheriting a contract they never agreed to. Spain also included the “Points and Floating weeks” systems, as these did not provide any tangible product as they are a “right to use” and “subject to availability”.

So once again the point of the story is due diligence, do your homework, ask the questions, can they prove what they say? How long have they been in business? Are they registered companies? (Although this in itself does not mean they are legitimate).

If you have been contacted by any company and want to know about them or how to find the information for yourself contact Inside Timeshare and we will point you in the right direction, after all that is what we do day in day out.