Browse Tag

DWVC

friend-or-foe

Timeshare Transfer Agents and Exit Companies: Friend or Foe?

Irene Parker and I take a look at timeshare relinquishment comparing Europe to America. As many Europeans own timeshares purchased in America, it’s useful to have the complete picture. This time she asks the question “Timeshare Transfer Agents: Friend or Foe?

For those not familiar with the term, Transfer Agents advertise offering timeshare owners a guaranteed “deed-back” even if the timeshare program is not deeded. (more on this further on).

In Europe we have a different take on this subject, as we do not have the same model of Transfer Agents like the US. We tend to have resale firms and exit companies, some purport to be legal firms, who for a sizeable fee will relinquish your contract. Many of these companies do both, so the lines can be a ltiile blurred. Although we do have some of the same problems, such as resorts /developers who do not recognise the sale and or transfer.

Here we bring in the ongoing story of two elderly sisters, known as Mrs B. Around two years ago they took up the services of a company  who claimed they would get compensation for them if they joined their “Class Action” group. But in order to do this they had to pay around £5965 to relinquish their two timeshares, one was Oasis Lanz in Lanzarote, the other was Dona Lola Club on the Costa del Sol, run by MacDonald Resorts and Hotels.

Mrs B signed a power of attorney so the company could work on her behalf, all appeared to be above board. After around a year she eventually received notification that her timeshare had gone, both had been transferred / sold to a gentleman for £1 each. Inside Timeshare has all documents relating to this.

Sounds all well and good.

Well, as far as Oasis Lanz is concerned it is, Mrs B has not had any contact from them or received any maintenance bills. The problem is Dona Lola Club and MacDonald Resorts, they will not recognise the transfer. This has now caused a problem for Mrs B and her sister.

They have been subject to threats of legal action by a debt collecting agency, Network Credit Services, employed by MacDonald Resorts. According to them there is £1412.54 (as of April 2016) for maintenance, accrued after the supposed transfer, (this amount increases as time goes on).

So why do MacDonald Resorts not recognise this transfer?

On speaking to Network Credit Services and explaining that the debt was under dispute, Maureen stated that MacDonald Resorts will not recognise any transfer made by this company, because in Maureens words McDonalds just get paperwork back from  saying no longer required”. In other words, there was no actual sale or legal relinquishment. You will see the same in the article by Irene, using a company to take on the transfers.

This case is still ongoing with official complaints about the chasing of this “debt” going through the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Another aspect that is very common in Europe is the “Bait and Switch” tactic employed by many companies claiming to be “resale” firms.

The basis of this method is very simple, the timeshare owner either contacts a company they have found on the internet, or, they have been cold called by. They promise they can sell your timeshare and even give a very high valuation over the phone. Next they arrange a meeting to discuss your options.

Unfortunately there is no resale market, with one company actually stating this, so what then happens?

Simple, in order to get rid of your timeshare you must now purchase another product, be it leisure credits or discount holiday club. At the meeting ( read sales presentation), you are told that the product will cost around £10k to £12k. But don’t worry, we will discount that price for the value of your timeshare, so it will only cost you a fraction of that amount.

This was used to dupe many owners into Club Class and DWVC, where the incentive was the cashback offer. With this you are given a certificate for the value of the timeshare plus the cost of joining the club. In 3 to 5 years, as long as you follow the rules (which were complicated) you could then claim back the value on the certificate. So far we have never known anyone who did get paid out.

But what happened to your timeshare?

For many it was simple, they did not get rid of it, then after a couple of years they found they owned years of back maintenance. The timeshares were not transferred or relinquished, they are still liable for the maintenance and still own it, causing many a stressful situation with debt collectors.

So, let us look at what the situation is in the USA.

Timeshare Transfer Agents: Friend or Foe?

dollar    By Irene Parker November 20, 2016

Lately, a company by the name of Resort Release has been running an ad on my Facebook feed. It is always frustrating to invest time and energy campaigning to improve the timeshare industry, only to have companies we don’t approve of take out ads promoting their service. At least Inside Timeshare can control who posts on their site.

Transfer agents advertise offering timeshare owners a guaranteed “deed-back” even if the timeshare program is not deeded. The upfront fee ranges from $3500 to $7000 or more. Contracts taken back are “bundled” 25 to 50 and sold back to the developers, similar to what happened during the worldwide subprime mortgage crisis. The developers resell for full value.

What else can happen to the points or weeks or “inventory” recovered?

According to Greg Crist of the National Timeshare Owners Association,   

“There are basically four buckets that transfer companies often attempt to put inventory into…

Bucket 1 – Works with an inventory broker who may or may not have a direct inventory recovery agreement. *Branded properties only

Bucket 2 – Lists timeshare properties on eBay and Craig’s List for $1.00

Bucket 3 – Transfers to “Mules” *Foreign Nationals who may be judgement proof

Bucket 4 – Transfers to Companies who later dissolve the corporation administratively. *Leaves resort pursuing a clouded title, doubling recovery costs and impacting association’s bad debt line, which all remaining owners on the roster end up absorbing.”

saleman

Keep Reading

bbc-scotland

BBC Scotland Investigates the Problems of Timeshare Contracts.

On Monday 24 October BBC Scotland broadcast an investigation into the problems people have in getting out of their timeshare, especially the elderly.

It highlighted an elderly retired couple from Scotland who purchased their timeshares from a company that is now owned by MacDonald Resorts and Hotels. The company is now owned 50% by HBOS Group (Bank of Scotland and Halifax, part of the Lloyds Banking Group) and 50% by Donald MacDonald. They originally purchased at the Dona Lola Club in Spain, when their children were young. But as we have seen on many occasions, ill health prevents them from travelling, especially abroad, because of the problem of the increasing cost of travel insurance.

mcdonald logohbos

They have been trying to “relinquish” their contract for around two years, but the resort management, MacDonalds, want them to pay over £3000 to relinquish their two weeks. Even after they have paid their maintenance every year since purchasing. They are still trying to negotiate with MacDonalds, but are still paying £1600 maintenance each year.

This is not a new story to Inside Timeshare, we have the story of Mrs B, who used another company to “get rid” of her timeshare at Dona Lola, she is 83 and also in ill health and unable to travel. Like many others she paid her maintenance every year without fail, even though for the past ten years has never used it, Mrs B and her sister could not even travel to any of the UK resorts.

When she eventually paid another company to get rid of it for her the trouble started. Inside Timeshare has copies of the documents that show her timeshare has been transferred to another person, but MacDonalds refuse to accept this and say she owes maintenance. They have even instructed a debt collection agency, Network Credit Services, to chase for the the £1412.54 they say she owes. She has already received a final demand to pay within 7 days or face court action.

Inside Timeshare has helped her to formulate an official complaint to the Financial Ombudsman Service to try and resolve the matter. This is still underway, yet it is that time of year when new maintenance bills will be falling on the door mat.

old-lady
How much!

MacDonalds stated in the programme:  “We’ve been widely praised for pioneering the introduction of a practical exit mechanism for owners. In fact, 90% of resort owners voted in favour of amending their resorts’ constitutions to formally adopt these fair and reasonable proposals”.

Well the proposal to be able to get out was not what you could call fair, it required at least 4 years payment of maintenance and was limited to every 2 years with first come first served.

In the next comment MacDonalds also stated: “However, it would clearly be detrimental to the upkeep of the resorts and unfair on the remaining resort owners if people were allowed to walk away from their contractual and legal obligations without some form of reasonable recompense which allows for the quality of facilities at the resorts to be maintained for future generations”.

This last statement clearly shows that MacDonalds are not interested in the owners apart from the continued collection of fees. So what is the reason for this statement?

It is quite simple, MacDonalds are a management company employed by the resorts, to run, maintain and collect the management fees. They actually own no property, like most of these large companies, i.e Diamond and Diversified. In the past MacDonalds with the backing of TATOC, changed the members from fixed weeks to a points system, when doing this they effectively took control of the resorts. By taking over the fixed weeks, MacDonalds become responsible for the maintenance fees on those weeks, with you the points owners paying a hefty increase in your charges.

By allowing people to hand back their ownership, with no prospect of new clients purchasing what is now a very expensive way to holiday, it will cost them. After all MacDonalds does not want to use their own money.

Another point to the broadcast was the problem of using other companies with their promises of “resale”. One company interviewed was one Inside Timeshare has highlighted in past articles, Sellmytimeshare.tv and Monster.

The BBC sent an undercover reporter, Fergus Muirhead, he contacted Sellmytimeshare.tv about getting rid of his mothers timeshare. Over the phone he was given a valuation of £9,400 with an invitation to meet with the company face to face.

undercover

He stated that it was obvious that they had no intention of paying him that amount from the outset of the meeting, with Sellmytimeshare telling him “We can’t sell the timeshare because no one’s buying them so we certainly can’t get that money back for her.”

He was then given by the advisor a series of figures, which had to be paid upfront on the day, this was for thousands of pounds. He was told he would be given “credits” which could be used as part payment for goods or even be sold.

Fergus stated that if he held them for 14 months, he could sell these credits for £17,216, which covered the £9,400 and the £6,700 he was going to pay upfront. It was also not clear as to how the timeshare would be disposed of.

The programme also interviews Stephen Boyd a lawyer with experience of timeshare law, he is also a partner at Athena Law. He said he had around 300 clients and was in the process of instigating a legal action against Sellmytimeshare.tv and Monster Travel Group, the parent company.

He stated: “My clients were told by this company that they could get rid of their timeshare, but when they went to a meeting they had to buy another product and they were promised a financial return.

“They’ve also found that the promised financial return never materialised and in many cases they’re still liable for the maintenance fees of their timeshare.”

When asked for a reply the spokesperson for Monster said:  “Customers seeking advice from us about relinquishing their timeshares are informed of the options available through us and are free to choose what they consider best suits them”.

“One of those options includes the purchase of a Monster Rewards Bundle, which can be redeemed against an increasingly wide range of goods and services, including travel”.

Follow the link to the full article on BBC News.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-37690840

Recent Inside Timeshare articles.

http://insidetimeshare.com/monster-credits-associated-companies-summary/

One thing is clear from all this, it is the owners of the timeshares who are suffering, not just from the timeshare companies but those who say they will sell them for you, only to sell you another product. Remember the Club Class and DWVC pitch, we will take your timeshare from you if you join our club, we will then give you a “Cashback” certificate for the value of the timeshare and the cost of joining. This was to last either 3 or 5 years, at which point you claimed from the cashback company supposedly the value on the certificate. Guess what, no one ever did and in most cases they still were liable for the maintenance fees.

Timeshares are not worth anything, they lose value the moment you purchase, even in the USA as we have seen from recent articles, they sell only for a fraction of the original cost if at all. So the warning here is do not believe it when you are told you timeshare is worth thousands, check out ebay, they can’t even give them away.

If you require any further information about this or any other matter, or need any help in finding out about any company you may be thinking of doing business with, Inside Timeshare will be pleased to help. Remember being forewarned is being forearmed.

research

minefield

More From Across The Pond.

As we all know trying to sell your timeshare or as they like to call it today “holiday ownership”, is a bit of a minefield. Who can you trust?

 

Our friends from across the Atlantic have the same problems, you think you have got rid of your timeshare, then suddenly you receive the annual maintenance bill. The resort does not recognise the transfer. This happened to many people who ended up buying into Designer Way Vacation Club several years ago.

 

With this particular scheme, you “sold” your timeshare to DWVC but had to pay many thousands of pounds to become a member of their club. The perks, well, you could stay in the same resorts for a fraction of the cost, discounts on flights, and off course no more maintenance bills. Oh yes, I almost forgot, you also were given a “cashback” certificate, this was for the value of your timeshare plus a bit extra for the cost of your membership. Then after registering it (which was a nightmare task), you had to wait around 5 years for it to mature. If you were lucky you may have got a few quid back, that’s if you claimed correctly.

 

Then after finding that the so called “discounts” were not what you were told at the presentation, (actually costing more), you suddenly received a maintenance bill for several years arrears. All this with the threats of legal action by a debt collecting agency. DWVC did not transfer your timeshare, or the resort did not recognise it.

 

This has also happened to one old lady who owned a MacDonalds timeshare, Yes, I am referring to Mrs B. Her timeshare has been sold for 1euro, (she actually paid the company around £7,500 to relinquish, not sell it). MacDonalds is now chasing for maintenance arrears because they do not recognise the transfer.

for_sale

Following is an article written by Tom Tubbs, an advisory member of The National Timeshare Owners Association, the American equivalent of TATOC. In this article he clearly shows how some companies in the US operate and how it affects the resorts and owners. This was sent to me by my American colleague Irene Parker.

 

By Tom Tubbs

Island Consulting Realty – NTOA Advisory Board Member

 

We’ve all heard the radio commercials, received the postcards in the mail, seen the TV ads, seen the web sites:

 

“Get out of your timeshare now! Call us today. Guaranteed or your money back!”

 

“You own a timeshare you can’t sell? We guarantee to get you out”.

 

“Dear friends. This is ‘Mr/Ms. Celebrity’. I trust these people”.

 

Now, think back. Remember the similar ads we heard from different companies years ago? Where are those companies now? What happened to them? Are these just new companies who rose up to fill in the gap? Hmmm…..

 

So, how is it that you could sell your timeshare but continue to be on the hook for the maintenance fees? What I’m going to share with you is a real story that is taking place right this minute. The names are changed, obviously. The way it’s being handled is not brand new, but relatively so and it’s happening more and more and more. Read the story and make sure you don’t fall victim to this.

 

So we’ve told you in the past about “transfer companies”. You pay them $3500 or so and they take your time share from you and they promise that your days of owning a timeshare and paying the maintenance fees are done. Many of these are perfectly good timeshares that could be sold and money put into the pockets of the owner, but if you’re a reader of this newsletter you know the stories the transfer companies tell you to convince you to give up your money. These companies for the most part have no real estate license so that they don’t have to worry about a state agency looking over their shoulder. Many of them come and go quickly…..with your money.

 

But there’s a new sheriff in town. A company called Timeshare Transfer Registry (real name) monitors timeshare transfers. They are especially suspicious about transfers going into the name of an LLC or Trust. Suspicions go up when they see 10, 20, 50, 100 or more timeshares being transferred into the same name. Resorts can register with TTR to try to protect themselves from being deceived by the transfer company.

 

So here’s what happened. “ABC Resort” (names are changed now) gets a copy of a recorded deed showing one of their owners sold their timeshare to “Whoopie Doo, LLC”. The resort contacted Timeshare Transfer Registry and learned that Whoopie Doo owns a LOT of timeshares. It’s looking pretty obvious that the LLC will never pay the resort a maintenance fee and the resort at some point will have to foreclose (that’s what happened to your timeshare). You don’t care, right? You’ve sold your timeshare and the deed is out of your name, right? Wrong……to an extent. You’re definitely going to care. Here’s why.

 

The resort notified the LLC that they noticed the LLC has purchased a LOT of timeshares and it looks like an obvious case of a transfer company about to dump the timeshares on the resort; costing the resort a ton of money. The resort refused to acknowledge the transfer.

 

In an interesting twist, the LLC contacted the resort and swore up and down they were not the same “Whoopie Doo, LLC” that owns so many time shares. Seriously? Really? The resort contacted National Timeshare Owners Association (NTOA, http://www.NationalTimeshareOwnersAssoc.com/) asking for advice. (Now in the interest of full disclosure I want to mention I am on the advisory board of NTOA. Before I became a member of the board, however, I was singing the praises about this organization for a long time. Becoming a member [talking about you, dear reader] is not a bad thing. You know I would never steer you wrong). I was asked my opinion about this. I advised that the resort tell Whoopie Doo to go pound sand. Whoopie will probably threaten legal action but the resort should stand firm. The last thing con artists like Whoopie Doo want to do (hey! That rhymes!) is walk into a court of law.

 

So now here is an interesting situation. You’ve paid a company $3500 to take your time share. You have signed the deed over to this LLC. You actually no longer own the timeshare, this is technically true. But the resort is refusing to acknowledge the transfer which means you are still on their books as the owner and you’re going to get a maintenance fee bill each year! Congratulations! Now, you won’t find this out until you get your bill next year. By that time, good luck on finding those nice folks who took your $3500. You now no longer own a timeshare and you’re on the hook for the yearly maintenance fees.

 

“Wait”, you say, “How can the resort refuse to acknowledge a lawfully recorded transfer of a deed”. (we heard you thinking this). Well, there’s this little thing called fraud. It was a fraudulent transfer designed to make money by bringing harm to the resort. (As a side note: Some resort who have been burned by this are now suing not only the folks behind the LLC but also the original owner [that would be……you] claiming fraud).

 

So how do you protect yourself? First, if you find yourself in a situation where you want to sell your timeshare, call us. It’s what we’ve done for folks for the past 30 years and we offer different programs depending on what you have and your particular situation. There’s not many folks we can’t help. And for the few we can’t help, we can refer you to the right person who can or offer free advice on what to do. Secondly, if you’re bound and determined that you trust that famous celebrity or the nice person across the table from you who wants you to pay them a lot of money, ask them for a copy of their real estate license. They should offer no excuses, no “this doesn’t apply to us” stories; they either have one or they don’t. If they don’t, well……..I’d hate to be writing a story about your situation in an up-coming newsletter.

 

At least in the US there is a company which tries to ensure this does not happen, The Timeshare Transfer Registry, but even with this in place the scam still goes on, not only losing thousands for the owners but also for the resorts.

 

So what can you do about not getting caught, unfortunately there is no straight answer. All you can really do is check the company and check again, ask your resort do they recognise the company you are dealing with. If you are undertaking a private sale, again check with your resort on how the transfer is done legally. Once the transfer is complete, again check with your timeshare company or resort that you are no longer registered as the owner and liable for maintenance.

 

The biggest problem is actually finding someone who wants to buy it in the first place, just look on ebay! There are alternatives to trying to sell, some resorts will take them back, for those that do not, then there is a legal process of relinquishment. Yes this will cost, the amount again depends on the company, but beware, as Mrs B found out she paid for a relinquishment but ended up with a transfer of ownership to another person and this is not recognised by the resort.

 

If you have any questions about this article or any other timeshare matter, Inside Timeshare is here to help. Contact through the comments section and will find the answer or point you in the right direction.

sec75

Claiming Money Back From Your Credit Card.

There is a little tool that many people can use to get money back from companies they have paid, then never received the goods or services paid for. It is called Section 75 of The Credit Consumer Act 1974.

 

The law was put into place as protection for the consumer, it is not a case that your credit provider is doing you a favour, they are equally liable for the money if anything goes wrong. There are certain rules that govern this, provided you have paid using your credit card any sum over £100 you are covered for the full amount up to £30,000, even if you paid the balance by cheque or transfer.

 

Where I have seen this has been mainly in the holiday ownership area, mostly with resale companies. How many of you have paid a company to sell your timeshare only to find that in a year’s time they have disappeared?

closed

 

If this is the case you can claim this back from your credit card company, as they are  “jointly and severally liable”. The criteria for this claim is you have never received the goods or services promised, i.e. the sale of your timeshare. The company is no longer around or has gone into liquidation and or it was a fraudulent transaction under timeshare directives. This last point is using the EU Timeshare Directives about resale companies taking upfront fees, this is not allowed, the same as taking deposits within the cooling off period.

 

Many companies get around this by saying it is a marketing fee, in order to put your timeshare on a higher profile. Even RDO & TATOC members use this. To me it is still taking upfront fees to sell your timeshare. But this is obviously a point for those with legal brains to argue. At the end of the day there is no resale market, just look on ebay, people cannot even give them away.

 

Another area that section 75 has been successful, is with the various holiday clubs that have been around. Several years ago Incentive leisure Group / DWVC and Club Class were taken out of business by the authorities in the UK. Many people had paid thousands to join these so called clubs with the view of being free from their timeshare and maintenance.

Keep Reading

maze

How do I Find a Genuine Firm?

This is a question I am asked frequently, there is no simple answer. It is a matter of doing your homework, finding out where to look and how to look. The internet has made this easier, the only problem is which sites are genuine and which are not.

 

Firstly, let´s take a look at small claims companies, these are the ones you may be familiar with doing PPI claims. There are many such entities around, they tend to be using the Credit Consumer Act 1974 Section 75 as a way of reclaiming your money. There have been many pop up around the timeshare industry over the years. Many originated around the time that DWVC was in the spotlight and being closed.

 

A general rule is that section 75 can be done by yourself, Google it and the first two items will be Which and Money Saving Expert. The latter is run by Martin Lewis. Another source of help is Citizens Advice, or even your own bank.

claimmoney

Both these sites explain what the act is and how to go about claiming. Both have an extensive archive of template letters, they are easy to use, replace the markers with your information and the reason for your claim. Generally this will be not receiving the goods or services paid for or promised. Another general claim is the company has disappeared. This particular claim is one I have been involved with in the past, usually from bogus resale companies.

 

If you get a company to do it for you, many will work on a no win no fee basis. But remember when you do have a successful payout it may cost upwards of 40% of your claim.

 

Most legitimate companies will be registered with the Financial Service Authority, some may even be registered with the Ministry of Justice (Claims). These registrations depend on the type of work they do, but obviously they are the ones to investigate further.

fsa logo

Law firms, this should be the easiest, but how many people have been taken in by slick operations and websites?

 

Genuine Law Firms will be registered with the relevant authorities, in the UK it will be the SRA, these can be checked using Bar Registration Numbers. In Spain I use a website reddeabogados, they have made it a little more difficult to use than I remember. Again use the Bar Association Registration Numbers. All practising lawyers must be registered with their bar association. Using Spain as an example, a lawyer working in Malaga will be registered there, a lawyer in Barcelona will be registered in that city.

sralogo

If you are looking to find a lawyer to represent you in another country, a good first stop is the British Consulate for the area the lawyer is in. You can also go to the Embassy or Consulate of the specific country to check. In the world of timeshare doing this just diligence is the most important step you can make. It is the difference between losing thousands or getting the result you wanted.

One reader has sent in a comment which will be of use. There are some European Lawyers that are registered with the UK SRA as “Registered European Lawyers”. You can ask to see their certificate of registration, if they are registered then you can be sure the SRA has checked their qualifications. (See comments for the full version 04/05/16).

 

Inside Timeshare can help begin the process of research, if you have been contacted or are looking to contact any company and wish to know how to check them, we will help. Inside Timeshare can also put you in touch with various companies depending on your problem. We will also offer any advice if you wish to make a section 75 claim, showing where to get any supporting evidence.

 

Remember, do your homework and stay safe from the sharks!

testimonials2

Testimonials: Fact or Fiction?

I was asked over the weekend if reading testimonials on timeshare resale websites was a good idea. Could they actually be believed? Well there is no simple answer to this question, it really does depend on the company.

 

I have been looking at one website which comes up on a regular basis, sellmytimeshare.tv

sellmytimeshare-logo

Some of the testimonials show photographs of the people writing them, the strange thing is they are at one of the companies offices. This reminded me of how ILG operated when selling the DWVC membership. On this website you don’t just read a copy of the comments, you can also click on a button and view the “Original”. This proved quite fun.

 

http://www.sellmytimeshare.tv/what-we-do/what-our-customers-say?limitstart=0

 

All were written on the same types of note paper, many on paper torn out of a spiral notepad, some on lined paper with a margin, just like you used at school for your essays. All appeared very hurriedly written, it certainly looked like the notes were from those who had just attended a presentation and purchased Monster Credits. “Please write something nice on this piece of paper for me, so my boss can see I´m doing a good job”.

testimonial1

It makes me wonder if those people writing them have seen the website showing their names with the testimonial. Do they still agree with what they have written, or would they retract?

 

So the answer to the question can they be believed, is really down to you and how you check them, personally I don´t believe them, having been in this industry and having seen what goes on has made me very suspicious. For me a testimonial would be from the person once they have returned home, if hand written, on proper paper, like the stuff we used to use “Basildon Bond” not torn from a note pad, then written neatly in the old fashioned way. (do we still do things like that)?

 

Beware the testimonial then, like everything to do with timeshare make your checks, research the company and if in doubt check again. If you require any information on how to do this contact Inside Timeshare, we are here to help and inform.

fakelaw

The Resurrected!

One thing that never surprises me is the number of companies that disappear for a while and then suddenly reappear. One company that seems to have been resurrected are our old friends from Fuengirola, Ramirez & Ramirez Abogados SL.

ramirez1

Around six years ago this company was targeting clients who had dealings with Incentive Leisure Group, purchasing the Designer Way Vacation Club membership. Their pitch at the time was reclaiming the purchase price and promoting a class action against ILG and the cashback scheme. They passed themselves off as a law firm, with a website called specialist-lawyers.com.

 

This company was headed up by one Fabian Marcelo Ramirez, who was also the administrator of several sister companies in the same area peddling the same product. These were Fuengirola Servicios 2002 SL, Key Properties Town Advisory and Greenges SL. Many people had dealings with these smooth talking outfits, all losing very substantial amounts of money.

scacert

Ramirez & Ramirez began to have a field day when the ILG & DWVC operations were closed down by the Office of Fair Trading (UK) in September 2012. Clients were bombarded with calls claiming that a class action was being pursued by Ramirez & Ramirez, or that there were substantial amounts of money being held by the Courts in Malaga which were waiting to be paid out to them.

 

One Genuine Law Firm in Malaga had many dealing with Ramirez & Ramirez, LawBird whose website belegal.com highlighted them for several years, even to the extent that Antonio Flores was taken to court for liable. Ramirez lost the case with the judge actually saying in open court that it was not wrong to call Ramirez a “crook and swindler”

 

http://belegal.com/blog-by-antonio-flores/tag/ramirez-and-ramirez-abogados/

 

Then all of a sudden around June 2013, they disappeared, phone lines no longer working and the website closed down. After a few months, around October 2013, clients began receiving calls and emails from another company offering to help. These emails were signed by one Marcelo Ramirez.

 

Was it the same person, or one of the ex employees with the client list. Personally I think it was Marcelo himself. This didn’t last long as once again it all stopped. But the story is not over.

 

Just recently in the past month Ramirez & Ramirez seems to have come back from the dead. The address given is the same as before, Calle Cordoba no 35 Edif Villa Blanca 1C, 29640, Fuengirola, Malaga. This time all cases they had running have been won and the money is waiting for you. Only a matter of fees to be paid and you can have it back. Oh well, I suppose old Ramirez must be a little short of cash after his holiday!

backdead1

Remember the courts do not operate in this way, and if there are any fees to be paid, why not take them from the awarded amounts and send the remainder to the client. That seems to make more sense. So don’t fall for this smooth talking pitch, Ramirez did not have any cases going to court, they are not abogados / lawyers, they just have a very long track record of duping people out of their money.

 

If you have had any contact with this company recently Inside Timeshare would like to hear from you. Give us your story and we can warn others of any change in this companies pitch.

airplane-generic

What is a Flybuy?

Have you had a call offering a cheap holiday at a quality resort?

Did it sound tempting?

Did you think it was too good to be true?

Was it one you found on the internet?
bedroom

The chances are it was a promotional holiday run by lead generating companies. These are what are known as “Flybuys”. The whole point is to provide another company such as a holiday club or timeshare with potential customers.

 

In order to qualify for this amazing offer you have to meet certain criteria, be between certain ages, have full time employment, have a certain income and also be either married at least 3 years or been a couple for this time.

 

The terms and conditions which if you actually read them are rather interesting. I have read three from different sites and they are worded almost the same, as if it is the same person writing them. As many of these companies are linked this may be true. Failure to comply with any of these terms and condition could result in the loss of the accommodation or incur severe charges.

 

Another condition is that you must attend a some kind of meeting. Obviously a “Sales Presentation”. Kate Palmer of the Telegraph did a piece about this in March 2015. (see link below).

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/money-saving-tips/11496625/Return-of-the-timeshare-The-bargain-holiday-where-you-cant-leave-the-hotel.html

7-300x300

These holiday offers are nothing new, Timelinx used this offer with calls to owners of timeshare, offering Bonus Weeks. Once the offer had been taken the unsuspecting owners were then pitched for the DWVC Club, with them taking the timeshare off their hands and issued with the Cashback Certificate. We all know what happened next. The cashback certificate was worthless, you then found out a few years later on receiving a maintenance bill that the timeshare was never transferred. those  great deals you were shown were never there as the small print said “Subject to availability”.

 

The other company using this idea was Club Class, they used the same tactics of Cashback  great discounts and being rid of your Timeshare.

Keep Reading

La Pinta

Is It Resale?

sellmytimeshare-logo

 

On 9th March 2016 the TCA posted a piece by Harriet Cooke of The Sun newspaper, her article from February 2016 was about Sell My Timeshare, a resale website. In the article it stated that 2,250 timeshares had been sold or cancelled by them in 2015.

 

This to me seems very odd, as many people I have spoken to in the past have informed me that they had contacted this company when trying to rid themselves of their timeshares. What then has happened is a meeting has been set up with Glenmore Consultants at one of their offices; Bournemouth, York or Stratford upon Avon.

 

At this meeting the client is then pitched to purchase Monster Credits in order to be rid of their timeshare. These credits can then be used for future holidays, with no time limit, some have even been told they are able to sell the unused credits for a small profit.

 

So in order to be rid of the timeshare the client pays Monster Travel a hefty sum of money in return for credits. This is not a timeshare resale. It reminds me of the ILG DWVC and Club Class meetings.

 

Monster Travel is a registered business, it is part of Hollywood Marketing SLU based in Tenerife. Although according to their web site, from the 3rd March 2016 they have been renamed Monster Group (Travel) SLU.
Keep Reading

bogus

Help! Where do I look?

Over the years I have seen many ways that you the timeshare or holiday club owner has been fleeced of your hard earned cash.

 

Firstly the bogus resale companies taking upfront fees as guarantees, with the promise you would get it refunded when your timeshare has been sold or if they are unable to sell it within a year. Then promptly disappear and reform as a new entity.

 

Then we had the we´ll get rid of your timeshare but to do this you have to join our non existent or never works holiday club. ILG had this well and truly sown up with the wonderful cashback scheme. You received a cashback certificate for the value of your timeshare which was more than you paid to join this new club. No one ever got the promised amount and many never got a thing.

 

After the closure of ILG a firm on the Costa del Sol, Ramirez and Ramirez began fleecing DWVC members, with the promise of legal action to recuperate the money lost. Other firms wanted payments upfront for doing relatively easy claims against credit card companies. Many of these claims failed or were never even instituted.

 

Then after Ramirez was closed down he opened as another company to claim back what clients had paid the firm Ramirez & Ramirez. Obviously using his old data.

 

Now we have the bogus claims companies. These make out that the courts have already seized assets from holiday clubs such as ILG or Club Class and resale companies. The modus operandi here is that you have already been awarded a substantial amount by the courts and this company has been charged with tracing you in order to pay you the money.

payout 1

This sounds very nice. But then there is a small matter of tax needing to be paid. One company downloaded genuine copies of tax forms from the internet for you to fill in. Then once you have done this, a bank transfer needs to be paid to a non existent notary or some other person. Another company wanted Western Union Transfers made out to a private individual. Low and behold you never hear from them again.

 

Another part to this idea was the NIE Number. Some FIRMS stated you need one of these to get the money back and they would do the work for you. Obviously for a fee, usually several hundred pounds. Now the NIE is the foreign residents identification number, which you only need if you become resident in spain or are buying real estate.

 

There are also now the class action companies, many are taking substantial fees to pay for these actions which in most cases are never instituted.

 

There are genuine companies out there but finding them is very difficult. There are also law firms who specialise in timeshare law, and are very successful, these are not part of the timeshare industry and tend to be shunned or slated by the timeshare companies, resort owners and the so called trade bodies such as the RDO and TATOC. Obviously they don’t want to lose your maintenance fees or payout compensation.

 

Any genuine law firm will be able to show you case papers of cases they have fought and won. The lawyers will also show their bar registration numbers, all lawyers must be members of the association for the area in which they practice. These can be easily checked and credited.

law soc

You can also find information via the internet on how to get money back when payments have been made using a credit card. So there is no need to pay someone to do it.

credit cards

If you need any help and advice on how to find these things out contact inside timeshare for free and impartial advice. The information is out there, you just need to know where to find it.